The prevalence of potentially beneficial and harmful drug-drug interactions in intensive care units

Mehralian, H and Moghaddasi, J and Rafiei, H (2019) The prevalence of potentially beneficial and harmful drug-drug interactions in intensive care units. Drug metabolism and personalized therapy, 34 (1).

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Official URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30903758

Abstract

Background The present study was conducted with the aim of investigating the prevalence of potentially beneficial and harmful drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods The present cross-sectional prospective study was conducted in two ICUs in Shahr-e Kord city, Iran. The study sample was consisted of 300 patients. The Drug Interaction Facts reference text book [Tatro DS. Drug interaction facts. St Louis, MO: Walters Kluwer Health, 2010.] was used to determine the type and the frequency of the DDIs. Results The participants consisted of 189 patients men and 111 women. The mean age of patients was 44.2 ± 24.6 years. Totally, 60.5% of patients had at least one drug-drug interaction in their profile. The total number of DDIs found was 663 (the mean of the total number of drug-drug interactions was 2.4 interactions per patient). Of all the 663 interactions, 574 were harmful and others were beneficial. In terms of starting time, 98 of the potential interactions were rapid and 565 of them were delayed. In terms of severity, 511 of the potential interactions were moderate. Some of the drugs in the patients' medical records including phenytoin, dopamine, ranitidine, corticosteroid, dopamine, heparin, midazolam, aspirin, magnesium, calcium gluconate, and antibiotics, the type of ventilation, the type of nutrition and the duration of hospital stay were among the factors that were associated with high risk of potential DDIs (p < 0.05). Conclusions The prevalence of potentially beneficial and harmful DDIs, especially harmful drug-drug interactions, is high in ICUs and it is necessary to reduce these interactions by implementing appropriate programs and interventions.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: clinical pharmacology, critically ill patient, drug complications, harmful drug-drug interaction
Subjects: WA Public Health
WB Practice of Medicine
QV pharmacology
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine
Depositing User: Unnamed user with email zamani.m@skums.ac.ir
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2019 03:44
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2019 03:58
URI: http://eprints.skums.ac.ir/id/eprint/7595

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