Comparison of Phototherapy with light-editing diodes (LED) and Conventional Phototherapy (fluorescent lamps) in Reducing Jaundice in Term and Preterm Newborns

Hamidi, Majid. and Aliakbari, Fatemeh. (2018) Comparison of Phototherapy with light-editing diodes (LED) and Conventional Phototherapy (fluorescent lamps) in Reducing Jaundice in Term and Preterm Newborns. WORLD FAMILY MEDICINE, 16 (3).

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Abstract

Abstract Background: Jaundice is a common problem in neonates and the most common cause of hospitalization in Iran. The aim of this study was to compare safety and efficacy of LED and conventional photo therapy to treat hyperbilirubinemia. Materials and methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 130 term and near term infants over 35 weeks. hospitalized in a neonatal care unit and who needed conventional phototherapy. Samples were randomly divided into two groups: LED and conventional phototherapy. Outcomes included the rate of fall of total serum bilirubin (TSB, ring/dL/hour) and measured duration of phototherapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS software with descriptive statistics, t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: TSB level was not different in the two groups before the intervention (P=0.187). LED phototherapy was more effective in reduction of the level of TSB at 6, 12, and 24 hours. (P<0/05). Of the reduction from 12 hours to 24 hours, the highest and the lowest decrease in TSB occurred between 6 and 12 hours. Treatment duration was 50.18 +/- 6.7 in LED and 65 +/- 13.7 hours in the conventional group (P<0.05). Conclusion: LED phototherapy is as effective as conventional phototherapy and reduces the treatment time and a further reduction of the relative change in TSB. The LED phototherapy has less frequent side effects and lower costs.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Phototherapy; Hyperbilirubinemia; TSB; LED
Subjects: WS Pediatrics
WY Nursing
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Department of Clinical Sciences > Department of Pediatrics
Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery
Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery > Department of Nursing - Medical Surgical
Depositing User: zahra bagheri .
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2018 13:19
Last Modified: 20 Sep 2018 13:19
URI: http://eprints.skums.ac.ir/id/eprint/7225

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