The effect of oral royal jelly on clinical disease activity index (CDAI) and morning stiffness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Mobedi, Zahra. and Soleimani, Fatemeh. and Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud. and Parvin, Neda. and Taheri, Elham. (2013) The effect of oral royal jelly on clinical disease activity index (CDAI) and morning stiffness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Isfahan Medical School, 31 (252). pp. 1428-1434.

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Abstract

Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease which can cause articular destruction and disability in patients. Current therapies are relatively effective and sometimes harmful. Royal Jelly with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties may be used as an adjunct therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Royal Jelly on Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and morning stiffness in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: According to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1987 classification criteria, 80 patients with RA, who had active disease (CDAI > 2.8), were randomly assigned to receive Royal Jelly or placebo beside background treatment for 3 months. Morning stiffness, tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), evaluator global assessment (EGA) and patient's global assessment (PGA) based on visual analogue scale (VAS) were determined before and after 3 months of intervention. The changes in aforementioned indexes were analyzed by SPSS software. Findings: 65 patients completed the study (35 in Royal Jelly and 30 in placebo group). The sex, age, residence, disease duration and drug consumption had no significant changes (P > 0.050). In the first group, CDAI (P = 0.012), SJC (P = 0.024), TJC (P = 0.027), and morning stiffness (P = 0.004) had significant statistical changes; but only changes in morning stiffness were statistically different between the two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Royal Jelly has good effect on morning stiffness but not on CDAI and may be a suitable adjunct therapy. Further studies may demonstrate more significant results.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 0
Uncontrolled Keywords: placebo; royal jelly, article; Clinical Disease Activity Index; controlled study; double blind procedure; evaluator global assessment; human; joint swelling; major clinical study; morning stiffness; musculoskeletal system parameters; patients global assessment; randomized controlled trial; rheumatoid arthritis; swollen joint count; tender joint count; visual analog scale
Subjects: WE Musculoskeletal system
QV pharmacology > QV 752 Pharmacognosy
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Department of Clinical Sciences > Department of Community Medicine
Faculty of Medicine > Department of Clinical Sciences > Department of Internal Medicine
Faculty of Medicine > Department of Clinical Sciences > Department of Orthopedics
Faculty of Medicine > Department of Clinical Sciences > Department of pharmacology
Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery
Depositing User: zahra bagheri .
Date Deposited: 09 Aug 2017 06:27
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2018 05:28
URI: http://eprints.skums.ac.ir/id/eprint/2716

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